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Ask TWO Revived! (Formerly General Move Discussion)


Guest The Beltster

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Guest The Beltster

NOTE: This thread has been moved from the photos thread, so please feel free to talk about wrestling moves, be they your faves to how they are done here:

 

Arm's too straight on the clothesline, you miss or slip upwards you're going to hit him right in the neck and it bloody hurts that.[/victimofstraightarmclotheslines]

 

Put your arm in more of an L shape bud, palm should be facing him square so it hits the fleshy part of your arm rather than the bone, it's a lot safer, elbow should be at their sternum. Also makes a lovely slap if you do it right,

I'm late to the party but I just saw this and disagree. A straight arm stiff clothesline is the way to go and the only way I ever threw them. Those slack arm clotheslines with the L-Shape arm suck and look like crap. That straight arm pic looks brutal which is how it should look. Christ, I'd love to have footage of somebody telling Hansen or one of those old guys they are doing the move wrong and too stiff, they'd have f*cking killed you.

 

If somebody gets stiffed on a clothesline oh well, they'll smash you back later and you just get on with it, thats part of the fun or wrestling. Tit for tat. Lets not pussy-fy the move.

Edited by Saz
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And if you crack them one in the throat so hard they cannot continue? Hey I have no problems with stiff clothelines, but I have seen straight arms put people in the hospital.

 

It's all fun and games until someone properly gets hurt and you get the reputation as a dangerous wrestler. It ruins a show and usually means people just don't want to work with you.

 

An L Shaped line means you can really throw your weight into the hit and hit them hard and you also get a better sound out of the hit as you use the fleshy part of your arm, rather than the bone.

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Guest The Beltster
And if you crack them one in the throat so hard they cannot continue? Hey I have no problems with stiff clothelines, but I have seen straight arms put people in the hospital.

 

It's all fun and games until someone properly gets hurt and you get the reputation as a dangerous wrestler. It ruins a show and usually means people just don't want to work with you.

 

An L Shaped line means you can really throw your weight into the hit and hit them hard and you also get a better sound out of the hit as you use the fleshy part of your arm, rather than the bone.

If you crack somebody in the throat you obviously have no idea how to throw a clothesline so you shouldnt be doing it in the first place! I used to work stiff because I was slim and I didnt want to look weak, but working stiff shouldnt cause any more injuries that working light.

 

An L-shaped clotheline sucks, it looks like ass, it looks weak man, in fact, it looks more like the guy throwing it doesnt want to hurt his arm than anything else, thats lame.

 

If you know what you're doing, you should be able to take somebodies head off and not do any legit damage to them. I hurt 1 guy on a clothesline and that was when I smashed him across the nose with it because he flinched and decided to duck. That was his fault. Never had any other problems throwing straight arm clotheslines.

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Guest Jamster26

Haha, that made me laugh.

 

So do you actually "want" to take the other guys head off. :lol :lol

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Guest The Beltster

You want to make it look like you want to take his head off, not like you are working a clothesline so nobody gets hurt.

 

I dont even hit people with the arm, its mainly my pec and armpit that makes contact and sends people to the floor, the art is diagonally straight and when the guy hits your pec it makes your fully extended arm almost wrap around the back of the guys head. Looks great.

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If the arm goes around the back of the head, if there's a kink in your elbow, that's an L shape bud. The elbow should always be around the sternum when you hit.

 

But yeah, if you duck a line and get faced, that's your fault.

 

And yeah, Jamster, Belty was talking figuratively.

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Guest The Beltster
If the arm goes around the back of the head, if there's a kink in your elbow, that's an L shape bud. The elbow should always be around the sternum when you hit.
Its not thrown L-Shaped. I always had a straight arm, but the momentum of another person hitting into you at full speed would cause your arm to sometimes wrap around the head. Thats what I'm saying. There is a difference in that and running in with a bent arm looking all slack and weak.
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No, it's never thrown in an L-shape, that would be silly, it does land in an L Shape. What I was saying was that DC hit his opponent straight armed, which is wrong and looking at the picture, he acknowledged it.

 

If you have your arm so that it bends when you hit them, then that means you have the elbow in the right place to bend on impact, making the shape of an L. As soon as you mention the word bend, it's not a straight arm hit.

 

A bent arm also allows you to follow through after impact.

 

The reason for it not to be straight when you hit someone is that they are back bumping at the time and kinda slide under your blow, the momentum could bring a straight arm into the throat and cause injury. (Just in case anyone else wonders what the hell we are going on about)

Edited by Saz
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Guest Jamster26

Whilst we're on the subject of moves and things, curious mind, on a show, say, oh I don't know, Christian hit Cena with a spear, but Cena, fell back, before the move connected, thus making it look weak (hard to explain), does Cena then get told to go and practice taking the spear, in the training gym, or whatever they have these days?

 

Been wondering for a while, really. Do WWE focus on that side?

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Can I extend that question to include: If you wrestle someone new who has a very specific finisher that requires a little complexity in the set up do you practice the move a lot before the match or kind of just go through verbally the move and then go from there?
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Guest The Beltster
No, it's never thrown in an L-shape, that would be silly, it does land in an L Shape. What I was saying was that DC hit his opponent straight armed, which is wrong and looking at the picture, he acknowledged it.

 

If you have your arm so that it bends when you hit them, then that means you have the elbow in the right place to bend on impact, making the shape of an L. As soon as you mention the word bend, it's not a straight arm hit.

 

A bent arm also allows you to follow through after impact.

 

The reason for it not to be straight when you hit someone is that they are back bumping at the time and kinda slide under your blow, the momentum could bring a straight arm into the throat and cause injury. (Just in case anyone else wonders what the hell we are going on about)

I know what you were saying bro but I still disagree. You are saying "it does land L-shape" and sometimes it does, but thats not due to the guy throwing it, its due to the force of the other guy hitting into you so advising somebody to throw it L-shape when it shouldnt be thrown L-shape is where my disagreement is.

 

Still, everybody does their moves differently I suppose, I just dont think saying its wrong if its straight arm is right.

 

Can I extend that question to include: If you wrestle someone new who has a very specific finisher that requires a little complexity in the set up do you practice the move a lot before the match or kind of just go through verbally the move and then go from there?
Everybody is different but I never laid out a single match beforehand or practised bumping for a guys finish. There were times where guys came up and said I want you to take this move and I didnt know what it was because they had given it their own name, but once I knew what the move was it was ok. The 1 move I 100% refused to take was the Frankensteiner after being shot into the ropes. I couldnt ever take the bump without making it look crap so for the sake of the person giving it to me and not wanting to make them look like shit, I always told people dont go for that move or I'll back bump you out of it and I only had to bump a guy out of it once and he was green as shit and was lost after 2 minutes so it wasnt something I was mad about. Sometimes things happen like that. Edited by The Beltster
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Whilst we're on the subject of moves and things, curious mind, on a show, say, oh I don't know, Christian hit Cena with a spear, but Cena, fell back, before the move connected, thus making it look weak (hard to explain), does Cena then get told to go and practice taking the spear, in the training gym, or whatever they have these days?

 

Been wondering for a while, really. Do WWE focus on that side?

 

In WWE the wrestlers tend to fight each other on the tours to air out all the issues between two wrestlers, what you see on TV is usually the product of several weeks of wrestling the same person over and over again on a tour. So effectively if Cena doesn't get it right the first time, they'll try to do it right next show.

 

Can I extend that question to include: If you wrestle someone new who has a very specific finisher that requires a little complexity in the set up do you practice the move a lot before the match or kind of just go through verbally the move and then go from there?

 

Most moves tend to be variations of existing moves, so it can be verbally explained, sometimes they will go through the more complicated parts first with the person as you are working through the match before the show.

 

Most wrestlers get there early and spend a little time in the ring, so if it is something really complicated they can show it off there.

 

The major thing is, once you step through the curtain, you have said you are ready and understand all that is asked of you, if a move is too complicated to work out, the move shouldn't be performed unless both wrestlers specifically know what their role in that move is.

 

*EDIT* If this is causing discussion, I guess I'll move it.

Edited by Saz
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Guest Jamster26

Thanks Saz; much appreciated. Interesting to get the view of an actual wrestler on things, to do with wrestling!

 

The site should have one of them Q & A things. :)

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**Dr Beltster, Dr Beltster we need 100 CC of stiff armed clothesline for patient Jayfunk, stat.**

 

And thanks Saz/Belty, that was always something I was unsure about. Like I can't imagine the first time someone came up with the vertebreaker that they just said "yeah so I'll lock up behind you spin you upside down and then drop you on your neck" and the guy taking went "no worries we'll just wing it". I'd have assumed they'd have at least gone through it slowly, at least how to get into the move so it looked good.

 

Here's another question: When a wrestler hits kicks and you hear the slapping sound that makes it sound like they've really booted someone where is that noise made? Does the kicker make the noise off themselves or does the receiving guy have to do something like, I don't know, maybe he puts his palm out to slap the boot?

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Guest Jimmy Redman

On most kicks you can see the guy giving the kick slapping his thigh. Sometimes without that you can get a good sound just from hitting the right spot on a kickpad or on the body or whatever.

 

EDIT: I moved this to the US Forum since its a wrestling thread.

Edited by Jimmy Redman
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**Dr Beltster, Dr Beltster we need 100 CC of stiff armed clothesline for patient Jayfunk, stat.**

 

And thanks Saz/Belty, that was always something I was unsure about. Like I can't imagine the first time someone came up with the vertebreaker that they just said "yeah so I'll lock up behind you spin you upside down and then drop you on your neck" and the guy taking went "no worries we'll just wing it". I'd have assumed they'd have at least gone through it slowly, at least how to get into the move so it looked good.

 

Here's another question: When a wrestler hits kicks and you hear the slapping sound that makes it sound like they've really booted someone where is that noise made? Does the kicker make the noise off themselves or does the receiving guy have to do something like, I don't know, maybe he puts his palm out to slap the boot?

 

It's a bit of both. Sometimes the guy delivering the move slaps his leg/chest/whatever, sometimes the guy taking the move will make the slapping noise. The real trick is sneaking the slap in there without anyone noticing what you're doing. Too many guys make it blatantly obvious, and that takes the shine off it for me. I blame Shawn Michaels and Sweet Chin Music. You can totally see him slap his own thigh on his kicking leg. I was always taught that you slap the leg that you're standing on as everyone's looking at the leg you use to kick instead.

 

Then you get this dummies who clap their hands instead, which just looks terrible.

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